A Rose By Any Other Name

yellow dress field-4“I read in a book once that a rose by any other name would smell as sweet, but I've never been able to believe it. I don't believe a rose would be as nice if it was called a thistle or a skunk cabbage.” While I do feel like a kindred spirit to Anne, I kind of have to agree and disagree with her on this one. (If you don't know, the above quote is from Anne of Green Gables.) A name doesn't change the quality of a flower, but in these pictures I am standing in a field of rapeseed, and well, I do wish these pretty yellow blossoms had a better name! The fields of these flowers are so striking--a blanket of yellow amongst the green, but boy was I disappointed when I learned what they were called! I think Anne would be equally frustrated with the name. She'd probably come up with something clever and romantic to call it, like 'aurous acreage' or something equally dramatic and lovely. They might not be romantically named, but the moniker can't diminish how stunning these flowers look, especially en masse. Like a bit of sunshine captured in petal form! A pretty good match for my yellow dress as well, finally achieving my goal of blending into a sea of yellow! Maybe we should see if we can grow a patch of these flowers around our gatehouse to match the front door... 
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CONVERSATION

16 comments:

  1. I never knew what rapeseed flowers looked like - they're so beautiful and I agree, the names doesn't do it justice!! ❤️❤️

    Charmaine Ng | Architecture & Lifestyle Blog
    http://charmainenyw.com

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  2. I love Anne of Green Gables. I feel as if she has a quote for every situation. I love your outfit, so cheerful and bright. Do you think ahead about where you will take pictures before choosing outfit. Everything is always so put together.

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    1. She does! Especially nature-related things; I just love her descriptions of seasons and trees and things.

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  3. This name is really terrible, I agree with you :D But your photos are beautiful as always.

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  4. oh my gosh, I am in awe with this shoot!

    http://www.thewhimsicalwildling.com/

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    1. Thank you! It's a shoot we've wanted to do for awhile--these fields are just so pretty!

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  5. I imagine that's one of the reasons the oil from these plants is called Canola oil in the US.

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    1. Lol yes, can you imagine what they would call it otherwise?! My mother-in-law calls them "oil seed rape"

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  6. That flower field is heavenly I would love to run through there
    xo
    www.laurajaneatelier.com

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  7. The term "rape" derives from the Latin word for turnip, rapum. If we use the scientific name, Brassica napus, we see it is part of the cabbage family.

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  8. I know, right?! In German, I first learned the name to be "raps" (and I used to use it all the time for cooking oil called "rapsöl"), so when I learnt the english name...I just refused to use it :'(
    I love looking at the field so much too! I took pictures near one before (for my blog), but never in the midst of them. You nailed this look very well!

    Alive as Always

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  9. What beautiful photos of a beautiful place! After looking closer at the flowers, they seem very similar to what we call "wild mustard" here in California. Perhaps they have another name? ;)

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    1. I've been doing my research on this one! So mustard seed is in the same family, as is canola which some people call rapeseed although rapeseed still is a separate plant. The 'rape' comes from the Latin word for turnip (rapum) but it's not in the turnip family, it is in the mustard or cabbage family. So explains the similarity to the wild mustard and how the name came about, although I'm still not sure why it ended up getting a name from the Latin turnip.

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  10. Do you take these photos yourself or have a photographer? Xx

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    1. Hi Stephanie, I never work with a photographer per se, but my husband helps me with pictures quite often and helped me with this shoot. Although I started blogging by doing all my photographs on my own and I still do all of the editing. I still do shoots on my own with a remote as well, but it's so handy when my husband helps so I can shoot in half the time ;)

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